The Apennine Mountains Home

I have two more pictures of the Apennines here.

Move your mouse over the picture to see the names of the various features.

This picture of Archimedes and the Apennine mountains was taken in what would be the late morning on the Moon. Archimedes is the largest crater here, 85 Km in diameter and 2100 metres deep.  It is fairly old by lunar standards at about 3,500 million years and it has been flooded by lava as attested to by the flat floor and lack of a central mountain.  Autolycus, on the other hand, is less than 1,000 million years old, is 41 Km in diameter and 3400 metres deep.  It has central mountains but they don't show up well in this picture due to the high Sun.  The Apennine mountains themselves form the south-western rim of the Mare Imbrium.  They are 980 km long, 100 Km wide, rise to 5400 metres (Mons Huygens) and are some 3,800 million years old.  At the northern end of the range, between Mons Hadley (4800 metres) and Mons Hadley Delta is the landing site of Apollo 15 close to Hadley Rille which doesn't show up in this picture (but see below and my Apollo 15 page).  I was pleased at the number of mountains here for which I was able to find names, along with two Laci (Lakes) and the charmingly named Palus Pudridinis (the Putrid Marsh).
The scale markers are approximately 100 km long north and east.

The picture was taken with a ToUcam attached to my LX200 on 5th June 2006, when the Moon was 9.0 days old.

Date and Time: 5th June 2006 17:56 UT
Camera: ToUcam 740K
Telescope: LX200 with IR-pass filter
Capture: K3CCDTools. Low gamma, 1/33", 22% gain, 627 frames
Processing: Registax. 105 frames stacked. Wavelets 1 = 10, 2 = 5, histogram 30-200

A wider-angled view of the mountains obtained by using a focal reducer on the LX200.  It shows the Apennines as the south-eastern rim of the Imbrium basin together with the more recent craters nearby.  The scale markers are approximately 100 Km north and east.
An even wider-angled picture can be see here.
This picture was taken on 14th October 2006 when the Moon as 22.3 days old.
Date and Time: 14th October 2006 03:19 UT
Camera: Atik 1-HS
Telescope: LX200 with IR-block and Neodymium filters
Capture: K3CCDTools. High gamma, 1/100", 15% gain, 599 frames
Processing: Registax. 6 alignment points, 538 frames stacked. Gaussian wavelet 1 = 20, 2 = 10, histogram 0-170
In this closer view of the Apennine Mountains, the Hadley Rille, visited by the Apollo-15 Astronauts in 1971, can be seen at the top of the picture.  The largest crater here is Conon, 22 Km in diameter and 2300 metres deep.  Aratus is smaller at 10 Km, bowl shaped and 1860 metres deep.   Both are relatively young at less than 1,100 million years.
The picture was taken with a ToUcam attached to my LX200 with a X2 adaptor lens on 6th September 2004 when the Moon was 21.8 days old.

Date and Time: 6th September 2004 04:24 UT
Camera: ToUcam 740K
Telescope: LX200 with X2 lens
Capture: K3CCDTools. High gamma, 1/50", 23% gain, 303 frames
Processing: Registax. 110 frames stacked. Wavelet 1,2 = 10
This is a similar view to the picture below, but was taken much later in the lunar day.  It shows how the landing site of Apollo 15 was surrounded by mountains.  The site is largely in the shadow of the smaller (and as far as I know, unnamed) moutains to the west.
The scale markers are approximately 100 Km north and west.
This picture was taken on 12th December 2006 when the Moon as 21.7 days old.
Date and Time: 12th December 2006 03:56 UT
Camera: Atik 1-HS
Telescope: LX200
Capture: K3CCDTools. High gamma, 1/25", 16% gain, 452 frames
Processing: Registax. 9 alignment points, 426 frames stacked, wavelets 1-2 = 10, gamma 1.4
This is another view of the northern part of the Apennine Mountains imaged in the lunar morning.  The Apollo-15 landing site is still in deep shadow and the eastern rim of Archimedes is just catching the light from the rising Sun.
The scale markers are approximately 100 Km north and east.
The picture was taken with a ToUcam attached to my LX200 on 5th May 2006 when the Moon was 7.9 days old.

Date and Time: 5th May 2006 19:43 UT
Camera: ToUcam 740K
Telescope: LX200 with IR-pass filter
Capture: K3CCDTools. Low gamma, 1/33", 40% gain, 558 frames (of which 219 were obscured by cloud)
Processing: Registax. 112 frames stacked. Wavelet 1,2 = 10, gamma 2.0
Noise reduction in NeatImage.
This is an enlarged view taken a couple of hours after the picture above.
The picture was taken with a ToUcam attached to my LX200 with a X2 lens on 6th May 2006 when the Moon was 7.9 days old.

Date and Time: 6th May 2006 22:18 UT
Camera: ToUcam 740K
Telescope: LX200 with X2 lens and IR-pass filter
Capture: K3CCDTools. 50% gamma, 1/33", 0% gain, 603 frames
Processing: Registax. 205 frames stacked. Wavelet 1,2 = 10, gamma 2.0
Noise reduction in NeatImage.
This picture is very similar to the one at the top of this page but taken in white light with a DMK camera.   It is also somewhat less aggresively processed.  This picture is one of a set of 5 that form a mosaic from Copernicus along the Apennines to the Caucases, which may be seen here.
The scale markers are approximately 100 Km north and west.
The picture was taken with a DMK camera fitted to my LX200 on 27th December 2017 when the Moon was 8.8 days old.

Lunar Phase: 72.3°
Colongitude: 24.7°
Libration: +6° 56' in latitude, -7° 49' in longitude
Date and Time: 27th December 2017 19:07 UT
Camera: DMK 21AF04
Telescope: LX200-10 with ADC*
Capture: ICCapture. 1/618", gain 727, 1800 frames
Processing: Registax6. 16 alignment points, 100 frames stacked per point. Wavelet 1,2 = 5, gamma 1.3
*ADC: Atmospheric Dispersion Corrector
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